Options d'achat

Prix Kindle : EUR 17,99

Économisez
EUR 15,07 (46%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Offrir cet ebook

Offrir en cadeau ou acheter pour plusieurs personnes.
En savoir plus

Acheter et envoyer des ebooks à d'autres personnes

Sélectionnez la quantité souhaitée
Choisissez la méthode d'envoi et achetez l'ebook
Les destinataires peuvent lire l'ebook reçu sur n'importe quel appareil

Seuls des destinataires résidant dans votre pays peuvent récupérer un ebook offert. Les liens de récupération et les ebooks ne peuvent pas être revendus.

Quantité : 
Cet article dispose d’une quantité maximum de commande.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Partager <Intégrer>
Image du logo de l'application Kindle

Téléchargez l'application Kindle gratuite et commencez à lire des livres Kindle instantanément sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur - aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. En savoir plus

Lisez instantanément sur votre navigateur avec Kindle Cloud Reader.

Utilisation de l'appareil photo de votre téléphone portable - scannez le code ci-dessous et téléchargez l'application Kindle.

Code QR pour télécharger l'application Kindle

Plenty More (English Edition) par [Yotam Ottolenghi]

Suivre l'auteur

Une erreur est survenue. Veuillez renouveler votre requête plus tard.

Plenty More (English Edition) Format Kindle

4,7 sur 5 étoiles 1 614 évaluations

Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
17,99 €
En raison de la taille importante du fichier, ce livre peut prendre plus de temps à télécharger

Description du produit

Extrait

Introduction

Vegi-renaissance

Chunky green olives in olive oil; a heady marinade of soy sauce and chile; crushed chickpeas with green peas; smoky paprika in a potent dip; quinoa, bulgur, and buckwheat wedded in a citrus dressing; tahini and halvah ice cream; savory puddings; fennel braised in verjuice; Vietnamese salads and Lebanese dips; thick yogurt over smoky eggplant pulp—I could go on and on with a list that is intricate, endless, and exciting. But I wasn’t always aware of this infinite bounty; it took me quite a while to discover it. Let me explain.

As you grow older, I now realize, you stop being scared of some things that used to absolutely terrify you. When I was a little, for example, I couldn’t stand being left on my own. I found the idea—not the experience, as I was never really left alone—petrifying. I fiercely resented the notion of spending an evening unaccompanied well into my twenties; I always had a “plan.” When I finally forced myself to face this demon, I discovered, of course, that not only was my worry unfounded, I could actually feast on my time alone.
 
Eight years ago, facing the prospect of writing a weekly vegetarian recipe in the
Guardian, I found myself gripped by two such paralyzing fears.
 
First, I didn’t want to be pigeonholed as someone who cooks only vegetables. At the time, and in some senses still today, vegetables and legumes were not precisely the top choice for most cooks. Meat and fish were the undisputed heroes in lots of homes and restaurant kitchens. They got the “star treatment” in terms of attention and affection; vegetables got the supporting roles, if any.
 
Still, I jumped into the water and, fortunately, just as I was growing up and overcoming my fear, the world of food was also growing up. We have moved forward a fair bit since 2006. Overall, more and more confirmed carnivores, chefs included, are happy to celebrate vegetables, grains, and legumes. They do so for a variety of reasons related to reducing their meat consumption: animal welfare is often quoted, as well as the environment, general sustainability, and health. However, I am convinced there is an even bigger incentive, which relates to my second big fear when I took on the
Guardian column: running out of ideas.
 
It was in only the second week of being the newspaper’s vegetarian columnist that I felt the chill up my spine. I suddenly realized that I had only about four ideas up my sleeve—enough for a month—and after that, nothing! My inexperience as a recipe writer led me to think that there was a finite number of vegetarian ideas and that it wouldn’t be long before I’d exhausted them.
 
Not at all! As soon as I opened my eyes, I began discovering a world of ingredients and techniques, dishes and skills that ceaselessly informed me and fed me. And I was not the only one. Many people, initially weary of the limiting nature of the subject matter (we are, after all, never asked in a restaurant how we’d like our cauliflower cooked: medium or medium-well), had started to discover a whole range of cuisines, dishes, and ingredients that make vegetables shine like any bright star.
 
Just like me, other cooks are finding reassurance in the abundance around them that turns the cooking of vegetables into the real deal. They are becoming more familiar with different varieties of chiles, ways of straining yogurt, new kinds of citrus (like pomelo or yuzu), whole grains and pearled grains, Japanese condiments and North African spice mixes, a vast number of dried pasta shapes, and making their own fresh pasta. They are happy to explore markets and specialty shops or go online to find an unusual dried herb or a particular brand of curry powder. They read cookbooks and watch television programs exploring recent cooking trends or complex baking techniques. The world is their oyster, only a vegetarian one, and it is varied and exciting.
 

------------------------------------------------------

Raw vegetable salad 

Certain vegetables—cauliflower, turnip, asparagus, and zucchini are all good examples—are hardly ever eaten raw in the UK. When I travel back home to visit my parents, I always enjoy a crunchy salad like this one, where the vegetables of the season are just chopped and thrown into a bowl with a fine vinaigrette. The result is stunning; it properly captures the essence of the season and is why I would make this salad only with fresh, seasonal, top-notch vegetables. This is really crucial. Ditto the dressing: if you can use a good-quality sunflower oil—one that actually tastes of sunflower seeds—it will make a real difference. The best way to cut the asparagus into strips is with a vegetable peeler. 


Serves four
1/3 head cauliflower
(7 oz/200 g), broken
into small florets
7 oz/200 g radishes
(long variety if possible),
thinly sliced lengthwise
6 asparagus spears
(7 oz/200 g), thinly
sliced lengthwise
1 cup/30 g watercress leaves
2/3 cup/100 g fresh or frozen green peas, blanched for
1 minute and refreshed
2/3 cup/20 g basil leaves
scant 2/3 cup/75 g pitted Kalamata olives


Dressing
1 small shallot, finely chopped (2 tbsp/20 g)
1 tsp mayonnaise
2 tbsp champagne vinegar or good-quality white
wine vinegar 
1½ tsp Dijon mustard
6 tbsp/90 ml good-quality sunflower oil
salt and black pepper

First make the dressing. Mix together the shallot, mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, and some salt and pepper in a large bowl. Whisk well as you slowly pour in the oil, along with ¾ teaspoon salt and a good grind of
black pepper.

Add all the salad ingredients to the dressing, use your hands to toss everything together gently, and serve.






--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition kindle_edition.

Quatrième de couverture

Vegetables have moved from the side dish to the main plate, grains celebrated with colour and flair. It's a revolution that is bold, inspiring and ever-expanding.

Yotam Ottolenghi's Plenty changed the way people cook and eat. Its focus on vegetable dishes, with the emphasis on flavour, original spicing and freshness of ingredients, caused a revolution not just in this country, but the world over.

Plenty More picks up where Plenty left off, with 150 more dazzling vegetable-based dishes, this time organised by cooking method. Grilled, baked, simmered, cracked, braised or raw, the range of recipe ideas is stunning. With recipes including Alphonso mango and curried chickpea salad, Membrillo and stilton quiche, Buttermilk-crusted okra, Lentils, radicchio and walnuts with manuka honey, Seaweed, ginger and carrot salad, and even desserts such as Baked rhubarb with sweet labneh and Quince poached in pomegranate juice, this is the cookbook that everyone has been waiting for.
--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition kindle_edition.

Détails sur le produit

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B00NAFKLWE
  • Éditeur ‏ : ‎ Ebury Digital; 1er édition (11 septembre 2014)
  • Langue ‏ : ‎ Anglais
  • Taille du fichier ‏ : ‎ 384869 KB
  • Synthèse vocale ‏ : ‎ Activée
  • Lecteur d’écran  ‏ : ‎ Pris en charge
  • Confort de lecture ‏ : ‎ Activé
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Non activée
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Activé
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée  ‏ : ‎ 774 pages
  • Commentaires client :
    4,7 sur 5 étoiles 1 614 évaluations

À propos de l'auteur

Suivez les auteurs pour obtenir de nouvelles mises à jour et des recommandations améliorées.
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Découvrir d'autres livres de l'auteur, voir des auteurs similaires, lire des blogs d'auteurs et plus encore

Commentaires client

4,7 sur 5 étoiles
4,7 sur 5
1 614 évaluations

Meilleures évaluations de France

Traduire tous les commentaires en français
Commenté en France le 12 août 2020
Commenté en France le 1 juin 2015
3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
Commenté en France le 11 janvier 2021
Commenté en France le 26 août 2021
Image client
1,0 sur 5 étoiles l'article est endommagé.
Commenté en France le 26 août 2021
nous l'avons reçu aujourd'hui. Comme vous pouvez le voir sur les photos, le livre n'a pas été assemblé correctement. pouvez-vous s'il vous plaît conseiller?
Images dans cette revue
Image client Image client
Image clientImage client
Commenté en France le 5 août 2015
Commenté en France le 26 octobre 2014
Une personne a trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
Commenté en France le 30 août 2018
Commenté en France le 3 février 2019
Une personne a trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus

Meilleurs commentaires provenant d’autres pays

RossM
3,0 sur 5 étoiles Not a complete vegetarian cookbook
Commenté au Royaume-Uni le 23 mai 2019
9 personnes ont trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
Mata Hari
5,0 sur 5 étoiles Fantastic!!!!
Commenté au Royaume-Uni le 20 janvier 2018
12 personnes ont trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
caledoniagirl
5,0 sur 5 étoiles This book is inspirational. I may not follow the ...
Commenté au Royaume-Uni le 28 septembre 2016
10 personnes ont trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
oilili
5,0 sur 5 étoiles Yummy
Commenté au Royaume-Uni le 26 mars 2018
5 personnes ont trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
Amazon Customer
5,0 sur 5 étoiles Excellent I love it!
Commenté au Royaume-Uni le 5 août 2016
8 personnes ont trouvé cela utile
Signaler un abus
Signaler un problème

Cet article contient-il des contenus inappropriés ?
Pensez-vous que cet article enfreint un droit d'auteur ?
Est-ce que cet article présente des problèmes de qualité ou de mise en forme ?